Category: violence

58 Firearms Collected on Saturday

This weekend’s Gun Buy Back Program at the Johnson Stewart Community Center on Martin Street resulted in getting 21 pistols, 26 revolvers, three rifles, five shotguns, two derringer pistols, and one flintlock pistol out of the community. Two of those firearms had been listed as stolen in the National Crime Information Center.

Deputy Chief Brian Foley says that this was the first of many local gun buy back events in the area. Continue reading '58 Firearms Collected on Saturday'»

Gun Buy-Back Scheduled for July 19

The Hartford Police Department is collaborating with Mothers United Against Violence, 100 Man Movement, and We Works Coalition to host a gun buy-back event at the Johnson Stewart Community Center on Martin Street.

Hartford residents who turn in working firearms will be issued gift cards in varying amounts determined by the type of weapon: handguns, $200; shotguns, $50; and rifles, $50. Continue reading 'Gun Buy-Back Scheduled for July 19'»

Forum Discusses Models for Non-Violence

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By , June 26, 2014 3:41 pm

Nelba Márquez-Greene speaking at forum hosted by Trinity College on Thursday

“Tell the truth, shame the devil.”

Nelba Márquez-Greene explained that a woman from Glory Chapel — a church she used to attend — would say this during services.

Márquez-Greene said she was going to be doing much of that during her presentation A Professional and Personal Perspective on Trauma and Recovery at the Building a More Peaceful Connecticut: Tools, Models and Initiatives that Promote Non-Violence forum hosted by Trinity College on Thursday.

Márquez-Greene, founder of the Ana Grace Project of Klingberg Family Centers, is a clinical fellow of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy. She alternated between speaking as a professional, and speaking from personal experience. Her daughter, Ana Grace, was one of the Sandy Hook shooting victims in 2012.

The Ana Grace Project’s purpose is to promote love, community, and connection for every child and family, Márquez-Greene said. Part of that is addressing trauma, which does not only appear following natural disasters or shootings, she said, but also when one experiences poverty, racism, and insecure housing. Continue reading 'Forum Discusses Models for Non-Violence'»

Project Longevity: Targeting Gun Violence in Hartford

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By , May 18, 2014 10:31 am

Gun violence conversations have increasingly focused on mental health issues, shifting the dialogue away from the realities facing our urban youth who are at risk of being exposed to gang culture and its repercussions. To bring the conversation back to these points, Connecticut Against Gun Violence (CAGV) and Project Longevity hosted a screening of Shell Shocked in an effort to raise awareness and build support for Project Longevity, a new, targeted initiative focused on eliminating group-related violence in urban neighborhoods.

Shell Shocked examines the environment that contributes to gun violence and then explores solutions that helps break the cycle of poverty and violence among urban youth. Realizing the need for a dialogue that bridged the gap between the many people and institutions impacted by violent crime, Director John Richie sought to expose the realities of living in New Orleans, where every African-American child he was working with had been touched by gun violence.

Following the screening, Richie led a panel discussion among Tiana Hercules, Project Manager of Project Longevity, Hartford; Ron Pinciaro, Executive Director of CT Against Gun Violence; Reverend Henry Brown; and Sergeant Steven Austin of the Hartford Police Department.

The panel focused largely on the role of Project Longevity in addressing violent crime in an era marked by widespread access to firearms and strong opposition to gun control efforts from pro-gun lobbyists. Longevity, the Obama Administration’s community-policing approach to prevent gun violence, sends new federal grant dollars to urban neighborhoods, targets repeat criminals who are most at-risk of being a victim or perpetrator of gun violence, and offers an ultimatum: accept a comprehensive package of social services meant to help those who wish to break the cycle of violence and gang activity – or “receive the full attention of the law” the next time any violence occurs, even if those targeted were not directly involved in the crime. Continue reading 'Project Longevity: Targeting Gun Violence in Hartford'»

Lifelines Not Pipelines

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By , August 21, 2013 5:48 pm

The roadside memorials and prayer vigils serve a purpose no doubt, but neither gets at the root of violence.

This morning, the faith-based PICO National Network’s Lifelines to Healing Campaign brought a more radical message to Hartford.

“If a black kid on this side of Hartford got shot,” Teny Gross suggested,  treat the situation the same as if “the president of Trinity [College] got shot.” Continue reading 'Lifelines Not Pipelines'»

“We Have to Make Vibrations Now”

Rev. Henry Brown urged the hundreds of people gathering in Lozada Park to come together.

Literally.

How are you going to have unity, he asked, if folks could not stand next to their neighbors. Continue reading '“We Have to Make Vibrations Now”'»

Peaceful Trayvon Martin March and Rally Planned

Today was the National Day of Action for Trayvon Martin, but if you missed the noontime rally in Downtown Hartford, there is another opportunity to let your voice be heard.

On Monday, July 22nd people — who are being encouraged to wear black hoodies or t-shirts with supportive messages — will gather at Lozada Park (at Seyms and Mather) to vent about the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. Cornell Lewis, one of the action’s coordinators, said this is also serving as an opportunity for people to “design strategies to address racism/bias.” Continue reading 'Peaceful Trayvon Martin March and Rally Planned'»

Blowing Whistles for a Whistleblower

(left-to-right) Richard Nelson, Chris Gavreau, and Stephen Durham

Stephen Durham, the Freedom Socialist Party nominee for President in the 2012 general election, drove up from New York for the Thursday rush hour rally calling for Bradley Manning’s freedom. Continue reading 'Blowing Whistles for a Whistleblower'»

Trinity Gets Its Own Police Substation

A building which Trinity College employees say had been slated for academic use has been turned into a police substation.

For almost twenty years, there has been a police sub-station on the corner of Ward and Affleck Streets, just blocks away from Trinity College.

A glance at the campus safety log over the last several weeks shows that crimes which would land non-students in court are typically handled only by the college administration. Continue reading 'Trinity Gets Its Own Police Substation'»

10+ Years In

In 2003, to oppose the United States’ invasion of Iraq meant setting oneself up for anything from ridicule to threats. Having been called a traitor in no uncertain terms, I know this firsthand. Seeing the biased coverage of the anti-war movement was what compelled me to participate in Indymedia, as there was (and is) a great need for reporting on social justice from the perspective — or at least, with empathy — of those not in the dominant culture.

Too often, the stories are still told from those in positions of power. We can see this in the narratives created about the protests of police brutality in East Flatbush, Brooklyn. Most mainstream news outlets attached the word “riot” to what had been happening, despite citizen journalists’ video footage showing that the majority of the protests were peaceful, if not in language, at least in action.

A press release does not a story make. Continue reading '10+ Years In'»


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