global issues

July 2016 Events in Hartford

July 1

  • An event? You tell me. There will be a DUI Enforcement Checkpoint in the vicinity of 90 Brainard Road starting at 5 p.m. today. It is funded through a grant from the State of Connecticut Department of Transportation DUI Enforcement Program, so don’t waste your time blaming Obama or Bronin. Also, if you lived here, you could just walk home and never need to concern yourself with DUIs.
  • Albanian Festival: dance, music, and food at the Albanian Community Center, 161 Franklin Avenue. 6-11 p.m.

Boom Box Parade, Willimantic

July 2

  • Free Yoga in Pope Park at 11 a.m. Bring your own mat and water; dress for exercise. Instruction will be in Spanish and English. Meet by the pond.
  • Albanian Festival: dance, music, and food at the Albanian Community Center, 161 Franklin Avenue. 4-11 p.m.
  • There will be a dual video release party for Tang Sauce and Zulynette Morales at the Studio at Billings Forge (539 Broad Street), 5-9 p.m. The evening will also include live music, poetry, and visual art. $10 at the door.

July 3

  • Free yoga in Colt Park at 11 a.m. Bring your own mat and water; wear comfortable clothing. Meet on the lawn near the Wethersfield Avenue entrance.
  • There will be free walking tours of Coltsville National Historical Park at 2 p.m. Meet by the Colt monument near the Wethersfield Avenue entrance to Colt Park.

July 4

  • If you’d like to celebrate Independence Day in a true community fashion, where the entertainment showcases local creativity, leave Hartford for the day and go to Willimantic’s W.I.L.I. Boom Box Parade. Bring your own boom box and lawn chairs. Parade starts at Jillson Square at 11 a.m. and heads down Main Street. It’s free, wacky, spirited, and not being paid for by Hartford residents’ tax dollars.

(more…)

More Arrests in the Black Lives Matter Movement

Twelve people were arrested in an announced Black Lives Matter rally late Monday afternoon when they blocked Albany Avenue at Bloomfield Avenue, one of the major roads used for commuters leaving Hartford for West Hartford and beyond during rush hour.

There were two non-violent action trainings provided for participants before this latest rally, trainings that were also announced and should have clued in anyone paying any attention that a detour might have been in the stars for Monday afternoon. (more…)

July 2015 Events

July 1

  • North End Farmers’ Market: every Wednesday, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. at 80 Coventry Street.
  • Get HYPEd at The Hartford Club: Casual networking for young professionals, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free, no registration required. The Hartford Club is located at 46 Prospect Street. Bring your business cards.
  • Free Chamber Music¬† from Jesse Irons & Sylvia Berry, Violin and Forte Piano at 6 p.m. in the Chapel at Trinity College.
  • Free yoga: take a beginners class for free thanks to Bikram Yoga Downtown Hartford. Except this won’t be at the studio. Instead, go to the Marriott Residence Inn (942 Main St). Bring a mat, water, towel, and wear comfortable clothing. 6:30-7:45 p.m. No registration necessary.
  • The 1st Connecticut Governor’s Foot Guard Band performs on the Rose Garden Lawn at Elizabeth Park from 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Rain date: July 2nd.
  • The Summer Carillon Series continues with Joey and Vera Brink performing at 7 p.m. Bring a blanket, lawn chair, and picnic to listen from the Main Quad at Trinity College. Free. (more…)

Thursday: Community Forum on Violence Prevention

Thursday’s No More Fear! forum is designed to unite the community against violence and seek solutions. Panelists are expected to discuss the causes and effects of violence, from non-fatal shootings to homicides. Various organizations will be on hand to connect residents with resources in the community.

Lew Brown and Anthony Griffin with be co-moderating the event. Speakers will include Henrietta Beckman from Mothers United Against Violence; Stephen Palmer of Good Soil Entertainment Ministry; Kevin Outar, who does community outreach for Father Works with the Village for Families and Children; Damaris Reyes-Goodman from Project Longevity; and Sergeant Steve Austin of the Hartford Police Department. Each will speak for a few minutes, then the public will have the opportunity to ask questions.

(more…)

BK Keeps Doors Open, Dunkin’ Cuts the Caffeine Supply

Thursday’s actions in Hartford and New Haven were portrayed by organizers in a press release as a “walk off,” but that term does not seem to fit with what actually went on. At noon on Airport Road in Hartford, there was no dramatic exit of employees from the Dunkin’ Donuts as had been implied; instead, there was one employee from that location present at the rally, who had simply not gone in to work.

A few minutes before the announced start time of noon, protestors were actually across the street, on the sidewalk near Burger King. Two police cruisers were on the south side of the street, with officers telling activists repeatedly to get out of the drive-thru area.

The group, before the announced noon start time, apparently attempted to enter the Dunkin’ Donuts. I was informed that the door had been locked. America might run on Dunkin’, but this one was willing to cut off that fuel supply in Hartford as long as a few dozen people with a drums and a megaphone were nearby. The door was seen opening to allow a patron out, only to be immediately locked again. (more…)

Trinity International Hip Hop Festival Brings the Sun and the Noise

Vox Sambou on the mic

Native Sun

With artists from Haiti, South Africa, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Spain, Mozambique, UK, Cape Verde, Korea, Canada, India, Philippines, Czech Republic, and the United States, the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival celebrated its ninth year. The event’s main draw is the concert, but over several days there are lectures and workshops, films, dance, live graffiti art, and more. (more…)

Championing Human Rights

Morgan Wienberg was unfazed by the cheers coming from the bar on the other side of Wood-n-Tap each time the Red Sox moved one base closer to the championship; without so much as a pause, she continued telling the Torah on Tap group about the work she has done in Haiti to reunite children with their parents.

Wienberg, originally from Whitehorse, moved to Haiti almost immediately after graduating from high school; while spending five months living in a for-profit orphanage, she began to notice the children there were being exploited and abused. When people would donate shoes, she said, there would be a big show about it, but after the donors left, the children would again be in their bare feet and the shoes would be sold for the personal gain of the orphanage’s owner. (more…)