Category: crime/justice

Crackdown on Jobs

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By , October 16, 2014 11:10 am

Unemployment has not been a new topic of conversation in the city, but on the day of the big vote, there was a lot of talk about what might give Hartford a much-needed economic boost. Too many people struggle to provide for their basic needs, for their families.

Meanwhile, on that same day, ten individuals were arrested for doing their jobs. Continue reading 'Crackdown on Jobs'»

October 2014 Events

By , September 26, 2014 8:24 am

October 1

  • Free gallery talk with Carole P. Kunstadt whose Between the Lines exhibit is currently at Charter Oak Cultural Center. Noon.
  • AK Smith Visiting Scholars Series: “Society, Gender and Politics in Iranian Documentary Films”: The long history of the Kurdish people reveals a tangled web of geography, covering large portions
    of the modern-day Middle East. Road to Kurdistan examines the relationship between Iraqi and Iranian Kurdistan after the fall of Saddam Hussein and the subsequent opening of the Iraqi border. The film follows a group of Kurdish travelers crossing the border in search of their dreams. A young musician wants to promote his music in Kurdistan, the filmmaker’s father wants to find the grave of a famous Kurdish poet, and they all want to witness a land that has been off-limits to Iranian Kurds for many years. Of Kurdish descent, Persheng Vaziri ‘81 was born and raised in Iran and lives in New York City. She directed several personal documentaries about Iran such as Women Like Us and A Place Called Home. She is a producer for Bridge to Iran series on Link TV, and has worked on documentaries in the U.S. and Iran. A graduate of Trinity College and New York University, she is completing her PhD at Temple University in Philadelphia. For more information, contact Christina Bolio at Christina.Bolio@trincoll.edu.This will take place in the Smith House Reese Room of Cinestudio. Lecture at 4:30, reception at 6p.m.
  • Get HYPEd, the monthly networking event for younger (generally in the 25-35 range) adults, will be at Nixs on Front Street from 5:30-8:30pm. There’s no need to register. Admission is free. There are typically some complimentary snacks, but if you want other food or to drink you will have to pay for yourself or sweet-talk someone you meet into picking up the tab. This is described as “casual,” but we have learned that this really means “business casual.” (Those of us who work from home or in non-corporate careers need to have that type of warning). Bring your business cards.
  • Want another type of networking event? Come to Faculty Lounge, a free after-hours social event for educators. 5:30-7:30p.m. at the Connecticut Science Center. Pre-registration required.
  • Take a Jamming 101 class with Kelly and Caroline at the Hartford Public Library. Billings Forge describes it: “This hands on class will cover the basics of making simple jams. Kelly and Caroline will share techniques for making lower sugar jams; cover the use of pectin; introduce savory jams; and briefly review basic canning practices.” This is $45. Participants will leave with jars of jam, recipes, and an instructional booklet. 6-8p.m.
  • MakeHartford Show & Tell takes place from 6-9p.m. at 30 Arbor Street, B7. Bring something that you are working on, or just stop by to check out others’ projects. Free.
  • Edward Quinlan will discuss the new book The Justice Imperative: How Hyper-Incarceration Has Hijacked the American Dream. This free talk begins at 6p.m. in the Center for Contemporary Culture in the Hartford Public Library. Refreshments available at 5:30.
  • Trinity College Spanish Film Club will be screening La Yuma at 7p.m. in the McCook Auditorium at Trinity College. This is free and open to the general public. Post-film discussion will be in English and Spanish. Continue reading 'October 2014 Events'»

Random Facts from Open Data: Substance Arrests

By , September 2, 2014 11:41 am

Data can be deceptive. There is a constant parade of listicles published claiming that ten places are the most dangerous, unfriendly, depressing, or whatever adjective the creators believe will get people to click. Information is powerful and when presented without care, can be wielded as a weapon, the kind that can solidify stereotypes.

This map shows arrests in Hartford from January through August 2014, using HartfordData information. All that we can definitely know from looking at this is that these are the places where people have been caught (allegedly) with one or more substances, and that it is much more common to be arrested for possession than possession-with-intent-to-sell or actual sale.

Continue reading 'Random Facts from Open Data: Substance Arrests'»

Random Facts from Open Data: Police in the Parks

By , August 29, 2014 9:39 am

Goodwin Park

The HartfordData site has been up and operational since May– don’t let yesterday’s big announcement fool you. Real Hartford has been using it regularly for months. Over the next few weeks we will be sharing some of the more interesting finds in the database. Today features a glimpse at police activity in the larger public parks. What should be obvious is that this only reflects what was reported; if you were bitten by a loose dog and never reported it to anyone, it’s not in the database.

Some city parks — you know which ones — have reputations for being hotbeds of criminal activity. As is often the case, examining the data provides a different perspective. The vast majority of incidents in Hartford’s parks fall into three categories: drinking, animal complaints, and a cornucopia of motor vehicle-related issues.

The most common incident in Keney Park reported to the police in 2014: animal complaints. Between January 1-August 17, 2014 there were 17 reports of animals presenting some trouble or another. The next most frequent problem in Keney Park involved motor vehicles. There were three motor vehicle accidents causing damage in which the motorist evaded responsibility, another instance of a vehicular accident causing damage (but driver didn’t dodge consequences this time), one instance of a vehicle operated while the driver’s license was suspended, one accident involving the a motorist following too closely, one case of reckless driving, and one motor vehicle fire. So, where does this idea come from that Keney Park is especially dangerous? For the first eight months of the year, there was exactly one report of assault and one of a street robbery involving a knife. There were two reports of items lost or stolen during the same time. Continue reading 'Random Facts from Open Data: Police in the Parks'»

Another Rally for Jane Doe on Hudson Street

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By , July 30, 2014 8:46 pm

Jane Doe‘s transfer to the Pueblo Unit of the Solnit Psychiatric Center in Middletown during June — following months of being housed at York Correctional Institution, a women’s prison — might have seemed like the end of the fight, but ten people gathered outside of the Department of Children and Families headquarters on Wednesday to demand justice for the teen.

On July 12th, Jane Doe was allegedly part of an altercation involving four females. A letter issued on July 23rd by the Office of the Child Advocate states that all those girls were restrained and were described in DCF records as hitting each other and staff. Only Jane Doe was transferred to the boys’ unit of the Connecticut Juvenile Training School to be in isolation. Continue reading 'Another Rally for Jane Doe on Hudson Street'»

58 Firearms Collected on Saturday

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By , July 21, 2014 10:19 am

This weekend’s Gun Buy Back Program at the Johnson Stewart Community Center on Martin Street resulted in getting 21 pistols, 26 revolvers, three rifles, five shotguns, two derringer pistols, and one flintlock pistol out of the community. Two of those firearms had been listed as stolen in the National Crime Information Center.

Deputy Chief Brian Foley says that this was the first of many local gun buy back events in the area. Continue reading '58 Firearms Collected on Saturday'»

Forum Discusses Models for Non-Violence

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By , June 26, 2014 3:41 pm

Nelba Márquez-Greene speaking at forum hosted by Trinity College on Thursday

“Tell the truth, shame the devil.”

Nelba Márquez-Greene explained that a woman from Glory Chapel — a church she used to attend — would say this during services.

Márquez-Greene said she was going to be doing much of that during her presentation A Professional and Personal Perspective on Trauma and Recovery at the Building a More Peaceful Connecticut: Tools, Models and Initiatives that Promote Non-Violence forum hosted by Trinity College on Thursday.

Márquez-Greene, founder of the Ana Grace Project of Klingberg Family Centers, is a clinical fellow of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy. She alternated between speaking as a professional, and speaking from personal experience. Her daughter, Ana Grace, was one of the Sandy Hook shooting victims in 2012.

The Ana Grace Project’s purpose is to promote love, community, and connection for every child and family, Márquez-Greene said. Part of that is addressing trauma, which does not only appear following natural disasters or shootings, she said, but also when one experiences poverty, racism, and insecure housing. Continue reading 'Forum Discusses Models for Non-Violence'»

Rally for Jane Doe Outside DCF Headquarters and State Capitol

By , May 24, 2014 5:30 pm

Ray, a veteran who served in Iraq, Guantanamo, and Afghanistan, said the United States is good about sending help overseas, but when people are “in crisis” here, they are told to wait quietly. The marine said he was injured by an IED in Afghanistan. He has ongoing medical needs, he said, and was told to get on a two month wait list for treatment here.

Besides illustrating how the system is broken, he was at Saturday’s Justice for Jane Doe Rally “on behalf” of his cousin, Jenny, who he said was murdered in Brooklyn for no reason other than being who she was, a young trans woman.

Connecticut holding “Jane Doe,” a young Latina in near-solitary confinement, was the uniting issue of the event, even if protestors disagreed about which element of her case has been most outrageous or responsible for her predicament.

Two weeks ago Governor Malloy issued a statement that Jane Doe should be moved from the adult correctional facility to another setting. Several speakers at the rally, which began in front of DCF’s Central Office on Hudson Street, said they wanted to make sure that Malloy would make good on his promises. Continue reading 'Rally for Jane Doe Outside DCF Headquarters and State Capitol'»

Downtown Rally to Close Guantanamo

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By , May 23, 2014 4:04 pm

Today is the “Global Day of Action to Close Guantanamo and End Indefinite Detention.” It marks one year since President Obama said he would resume attempts to release prisoners from the detention facility. Continue reading 'Downtown Rally to Close Guantanamo'»

Project Longevity: Targeting Gun Violence in Hartford

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By , May 18, 2014 10:31 am

Gun violence conversations have increasingly focused on mental health issues, shifting the dialogue away from the realities facing our urban youth who are at risk of being exposed to gang culture and its repercussions. To bring the conversation back to these points, Connecticut Against Gun Violence (CAGV) and Project Longevity hosted a screening of Shell Shocked in an effort to raise awareness and build support for Project Longevity, a new, targeted initiative focused on eliminating group-related violence in urban neighborhoods.

Shell Shocked examines the environment that contributes to gun violence and then explores solutions that helps break the cycle of poverty and violence among urban youth. Realizing the need for a dialogue that bridged the gap between the many people and institutions impacted by violent crime, Director John Richie sought to expose the realities of living in New Orleans, where every African-American child he was working with had been touched by gun violence.

Following the screening, Richie led a panel discussion among Tiana Hercules, Project Manager of Project Longevity, Hartford; Ron Pinciaro, Executive Director of CT Against Gun Violence; Reverend Henry Brown; and Sergeant Steven Austin of the Hartford Police Department.

The panel focused largely on the role of Project Longevity in addressing violent crime in an era marked by widespread access to firearms and strong opposition to gun control efforts from pro-gun lobbyists. Longevity, the Obama Administration’s community-policing approach to prevent gun violence, sends new federal grant dollars to urban neighborhoods, targets repeat criminals who are most at-risk of being a victim or perpetrator of gun violence, and offers an ultimatum: accept a comprehensive package of social services meant to help those who wish to break the cycle of violence and gang activity – or “receive the full attention of the law” the next time any violence occurs, even if those targeted were not directly involved in the crime. Continue reading 'Project Longevity: Targeting Gun Violence in Hartford'»

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