October 2015 Events

October 1

  • Billings Forge Farmers’ Market: This farmers’ market is year-round either on the green (Broad between Capitol and Russ) or at 563 Broad Street, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • David Baker, author of 11 books of poetry, is the featured reading in this afternoon’s edition of the A.K. Smith Reading Series at Trinity College in the Reese Room of Smith House, 4:30 p.m. This is free and open to the public.
  • First Thursday After Hours at the Wadsworth Atheneum, 5-8 p.m. This marks the opening of Mark Dion/MATRIX 173 with an artist talk at 6 p.m. Music to be provided by Orice Jenkins and Friends. $5 general admission. Stick around for a free screening of Far from the Madding Crowd at 8 p.m.
  • Chris Grosso, author of Indie Spiritualist: A No Bullshit Exploration of Spirituality and Everything Mind will be at Toivo (399 Franklin Ave) tonight at 6:30 p.m. The first 25 people will receive a free autographed copy of his new book.
  • Free Bikram Yoga class at the Hilton (315 Trumbull) at 6:30 p.m. Bring your own mat and water. No registration necessary.
  • The next meeting of the West End’s Public Safety Committee is at 7 p.m. at the United Methodist Church. Anyone with questions or concerns may attend. CSO Joe Sherbo will be in attendance.

October 2

  • Connecticut Science Center will be holding another Liquid Lounge tonight, 6-10 p.m. This 21+ only event packs around 1000 people into the science center for after hours fun. This one is Oktoberfest themed. There will be yodeling, polka, a strong man contest, and more. $15 in advance, $18 at the door.
  • Come by the Trinity College chapel from 6:30-9 p.m. to take a non-violence action training. This is free and sponsored by Black Lives Matter.
  • Hartford Fashion Week. 7 p.m. Union Place Train Station. $40 for one day pass, $100 for three day pass.
  • Speak Up at CHS: 8 More Objects/8 More Storiesfrom 7-8 p.m., explore the Connecticut: 50 Objects/50 Stories exhibit at CHS for free. If you want to stay longer, you can check out the Speak Up event at 8. This is a storytelling event in which speakers will share about objects that have changed their lives. Admission to the storytelling part of the evening is $15 general, $12 for CHS members.

October 3

Author David Baker will be reading at Trinity College on October 1st

  • Debbie Alter will lead a tour of Cedar Hill Cemetery‘s resident artists, featuring William Glackens, Albert Entress and Katharine Seymour Day. Tour begins at 10 a.m. $5 general admission. Wear sensible shoes.
  • Opening reception for “Sell Me Down the River,” what is described as an “exhibition of videos that address matters of oppression, repression and loss of freedom due to the ongoing corporate assault on our democracy.” Free at Real Art Ways, 5 p.m.
  • Reception for Tadashi Moriyama’s “Sprawl” at EBK Gallery, 218 Pearl Street. 6-8:30 p.m. Free.
  • Hartford Fashion Week. 6 p.m. Union Place Train Station. $40 for one day pass, $100 for three day pass.
  • Stand-Up Spectacular with Sea Tea Improv & Friends! Sea Tea Improv and members of the Connecticut improv community will be performing at the Carriage House Theater, 360 Farmington Ave. at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.

October 4

  • Hartford Fashion Week. 2 p.m. Union Place Train Station. $40 for one day pass, $100 for three day pass.
  • Open Mic Night at Infinity Bistro: every Sunday, this free event begins at 7:30 p.m.

October 5

  • The Friends of Colt Park Walking Club meets every Monday “until snow gets in the way” at 8:30 a.m. by the Colt statue at the Wethersfield Avenue entrance. Bring your walking feet!
  • “DNA Sequencing: Implications for Society and Medicine” is the title of today’s noontime “Beyond the Podium” science conversation at Hartford Public Library. Dr. Stephanie Airoldi, STEM Program Coordinator at the Connecticut Science Center, will lead the discussion. This free program takes place in the 3rd floor Hartford History Center.
  • Soil for the Soul. They say: “Join us on Mondays for a journey of healing the soul through soil and plants. Learn how plants can increase the wellness in different aspects of your life. Discover how gardening will result in the healing of the mind body and soul. Each workshop will provide a different stage of healing through plants. We will explore how to grow your own plants, gardening for health and healing, local community gardens and the people-plant connection.” 2-3:30 p.m. at Toivo, 399 Franklin Avenue. $5.
  • There will be a Black Lives Matter rally at 3 p.m. at the Unitarian Society of Hartford on Bloomfield Avenue.
  • Intro to Zumba at The 224 (224 Farmington Ave). 6:15-7:15 p.m. $10 general.
  • Word Forge at the Studio at Billings Forge. Suzanne Levine and Janet Passehl will be the featured readers at this poetry event, with an open mic preceding. 7 p.m. Inquire with Billings Forge for more details.
  • Hartford Jazz Orchestra performs every Monday at 8 p.m. at Arch Street Tavern. Free.

October 6

  • Yoga at Toivo, 399 Franklin Avenue. They say: “Heartfelt and explorative classes. Students will experience fluid vinyasas combined with longer holdings to build strength, flexibility and improve balance. These Hatha style classes also incorporate meditation, centering and breath work. Every student is encouraged to find their own expression of each pose.” 10-11 a.m. $5.
  • The West End Farmers’ Market is winding down for the season, with only a few weeks left. If you’ve missed it, the market is on the Clemens Green, next to the Mark Twain House on Farmington Avenue. 4-7 p.m.
  • Happy, Healthy Potluck: bring a dish to share with others at ArtSpace, 555 Asylum. Label/be prepared to explain the ingredients of what you’ve brought along. 7-8:30 p.m.

October 7

  • Hartford Independent Chamber Orchestra gives a free lunchtime performance in Hartford Public Library’s atrium at noon.
  • Private Governance: Creating Order on Economic & Social Life: This lecture by Edward Stringham will include discussion on how “people spontaneously create organizations and explain how a ‘club is a group whereby people voluntarily join together.'” This lecture begins at 4:15 p.m. and is free. It is in McCook Auditorium on the Trinity College campus.
  • This month’s GET HYPEd networking event for young professionals and entrepreneurs will be at Caral Lounge, 1429 Park Street (entrance on Bartholomew). This is literally around the corner from a CTfastrak station, so I’m not providing you with parking instructions. Walk, bike, or take the damn bus! Free admission. Bring money for drinks and business cards for mingling. 5:30-8:30 p.m.
  • Jane Hirshfield will be reading from her work, 5:45-9:45 p.m. in Wilde Auditorium within the Harry Jack Gray Center at University of Hartford. Free and open to the public.

October 8

  • Billings Forge Farmers’ Market: This farmers’ market is year-round either on the green (Broad between Capitol and Russ) or at 563 Broad Street, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Salons at Stowe presents Can We End Domestic Violence? with featured guests Karen Jarmoc, CEO, CT Coalition Against Domestic Violence; and Garry Lapidus, Director, Injury Prevention Center, CT Children’s Medical Center/Hartford Hospital and Assoc. Prof. of Pediatrics and Public Health, UCONN School of Medicine. This free event is from 5-7 p.m. at the Stowe Visitor Center, 77 Forest Street. Reservations: Info@StoweCenter.org or 860-522-9258, ext. 317.
  • They say, “Charter Oak Cultural Center kicks off its 11th annual Celebration of Jewish Arts and Culture with Contra-Nation, a solo show by artist Elliott Katz. […] Growing up on a vegetable farm in rural Vermont within an earthy, multi-ethnic family, Katz’s artistic practice in part represents the collision of two cultural histories: his mother is a third generation Japanese American and his father is of Russian Jewish descent. Their communities intersected in Southern New Jersey after significant international upheaval in the 20th century that led to their separate relocation as agricultural laborers. They were both the first generation in their families to intermarry.” The gallery opening of Contra-Nation will be at Charter Oak Cultural Center (21 Charter Oak Ave.) from 5:30-7 p.m. Free.
  • Sunset Sounds Concert Series at Butler-McCook (396 Main). Richard McGhee & The Rahstet will provide jazz. Bring a chair or blanket, a picnic, and relax in the garden. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free.
  • Learn Spanish for free! The Hartford Public Library is offering an eight-week beginner’s class to the first fifteen registrants. A Connecticut library card (not even specific to Hartford) is required for registration. Today is the first class, 6-7:30 p.m. Contact the library for more info and to register.
  • Science on Screen: What Captain Kirk Can Teach Us — They say: “Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Trinity College Sarah Raskin, Ph.D. will explore what Captain Kirk can teach us about building up the neural circuits of optimism and inner strength.” After her lecture, watch Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Real Art Ways. 6 p.m. $11.

October 9

  • Art reception for “Efforts of Seeking,” mixed medium works and sculptures by Adam Viens, at ArtSpace Gallery (555 Asylum), 6-11 p.m. Free.
  • Read It and Sleep: every month Charter Oak Cultural Center hosts a story hour for children. This month the featured book will be Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel. The entire event is free. Kids will be provided with hot chocolate and cookies; the first 25 children get to take home a copy of the book. 7 p.m.
  • Vaughn Mauren, organist, with brass ensemble: “Music from the 18th Century City” — free concert in the Trinity College Chapel at 8 p.m.

October 10

  • If you’re a runner, you’ve already probably decided if you’re trying the marathon. For the rest of us, if you want to just watch and cheer others on, the race begins at 7:55 a.m. The race starts on Capitol Avenue in the area between the State Capitol and State Library. If you’d like a less congested place to view, check out the route.
  • Therapeutic Yoga: an entry-level stress reduction and relaxation yoga class at The 224 (224 Farmington Ave). Mats will be provided but bring your own towel and water. $5. This begins at 9 a.m.
  • Keney Park Clean Up: from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. help to spruce up the section of the park where Night Fall will be happening later today. They say: “You can BYO supplies, but we’ll have gloves and trash bags. I’ll try to round up donuts and coffee. This cleanup is rain or shine – unless the weather is severe. Dress appropriately. Note – After the evening performance, some volunteers will also be needed to stick around and police for any trash that was left behind. Nightfall is the only Hartford event that leaves the park cleaner than we found it! Both the audience and volunteers help make it THAT magical.” Volunteers will meet near the Ridgefield Street entrance to the park to distribute cleaning supplies.
  • Free admission to the Wadsworth Atheneum all day, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • The Suite Spot will be launching its mobile nail truck, 12-2 p.m. at 92 Weston Street. This is a free, kid-friendly event with face painting, refreshments, and manicures.
  • Night Fall: This annual event will be in Keney Park this year, on a lawn near the Ridgefield Street entrance. They say: “the grounds” (a part of Keney Park) “open” at 2 p.m. for side shows, food trucks, a market, and art activities. The performance begins at 6 p.m. Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets to this free event.
  • Hartford Wolf Pack Opening Night: This will be at the XL Center, time to be announced. Tickets aren’t free.

October 11

  • Youth Against Violence Initiative Program: on the second Sunday of each month for the next few months, youth (13-19) are invited to participate in seminars designed to prevent them from being both perpetrators and victims of violence. This is from 3-6 p.m. at Faith Congregational Church, 2030 Main Street.
  • Open Mic Night at Infinity Bistro: every Sunday, this free event begins at 7:30 p.m.

October 12

  • The Friends of Colt Park Walking Club meets every Monday “until snow gets in the way” at 8:30 a.m. by the Colt statue at the Wethersfield Avenue entrance.
  • Want to learn how to quilt? A free class is offered at the Hartford Public Library beginning today. This meets for eight Mondays, 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Materials will be provided. Unfortunately space is limited and this program is only for those 55+. Registration is required.
  • KNOW GOOD Market: Remember when Hartford had HodgePodge? Well, this is sort of like that, but not really. There are food vendors and some other things to buy, with musical entertainment. This event at 30 Bartholomew Avenue is from 5-8 p.m. Bring money if you want to purchase things.
  • Hartford Jazz Orchestra performs every Monday at 8 p.m. at Arch Street Tavern. Free.

October 13

  • Zumba at Toivo from 6-7 p.m. $5.
  • Artist’s Reception with Lori Waselchuk at Clare Gallery, 285 Church Street. They say: “This extraordinary traveling exhibition combines the photography of Philadelphia artist Lori Waselchuk with hospice quilts created by the inmates of Louisiana State Penitentiary (Angola Prison). The exhibit powerfully chronicles the prison’s nationally recognized hospice program. Started in 1998 by a staff nurse and inmate volunteers, the program was influential in transforming the prison’s attitude toward terminally ill inmates from “dismissive dishonor” to dignity and reverence.” The reception begins at 6:30 p.m. and is free. Free parking is available in the Saints Lot directly across from the church.

October 14

  • Film 101 continues at Real Art Ways with a screening and discussion of Singing in the Rain, 1 p.m. General admission: $11.
  • KNOX (75 Laurel) will be hosting a free workshop: “Putting the Garden to Bed.” Learn about ways to improve the soil health before next season. 5:30 p.m. Register.
  • Take a tour of the space during MakeHartford‘s open house, 6:30-9 p.m. This is your weekly chance to meet other makers. Free.

October 15

  • Billings Forge Farmers’ Market: This farmers’ market is year-round either on the green (Broad between Capitol and Russ) or at 563 Broad Street, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • The Neoliberalization of Girls’ Education and Possible Alternatives. They say: “Studies in education over the past decade highlight the hijacking of educational agendas and institutions by neoliberal rationalities and logics. In this lecture, Shenila Khoja-Moolji illustrates these processes specifically in relation to transnational campaigns for girls’ education, where the purpose of ‘education’ is reduced to producing wage-based labor and an accumulation of skills that enhance labor flexibility, and ‘girls’ are primarily articulated as economic actors, be it as an untapped market, potential consumers, or entrepreneurs. In particular, she analyzes the vocabularies and reasonings that the White House/USAID’s Let Girls Learn and The Spring Initiative and Plan International’s Because I am a Girl campaigns deploy in garnering material and ideological support for girls’ education and empowerment projects in the global South. This reduction of individuals and social projects to economic metrics and logics calls for excavating counter-discourses. Khoja-Moolji, therefore, sets out to delineate one such alternate framing (among many possible, and already-existing) of education by directing attention to muslim epistemologies. Specifically, she presents the views of the Shi’i muslim leader, His Highness the Aga Khan, about education and its purpose, which cast doubt around the reduction of education to economic logics.” This lecture at Trinity College in the Mather Hall Wean Terrace Rooms is free and open to the public. It begins at 12:15 p.m.
  • In this Jewish Studies Lecture, Prof. Carmel Chiswick will be talking about How Economic Choices Shape Religious Traditions. This is free and open to the public. It starts at 4:30 p.m. in Mather Hall’s Rittenberg Lounge at Trinity College.

October 16

  • At the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, “join a discussion of 19th-century Spiritualism and how it intersected with the feminism and suffrage movement.” Featured guest: Susan Campbell. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free.
  • Musical Theater Revue: This performance will feature excerpts from shows written by Stephen Sondheim, Stephen Schwartz, Jeanine Tesori, William Finn, Charles Strouse, Barbara Schottenfeld, Elizabeth Swados, David Evans, and Tom Greenwald. This begins at 7:30 p.m. in Austin Arts Center at Trinity College. It is free, but tickets are required: Call 860-297-2199.
  • Sea Tea Improv’s Longform Showcase at the Studio at Billings Forge: Maybe you need a long explanation of what this is, but too bad. It’s a chance to laugh. 8 p.m. $10.

October 17

  • KNOX is organizing a clean up of Wexford Park, including Heaven Skate Park. Besides picking up trash, you might be weeding flower beds and planting vegetation. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Breakfast and lunch are included. Contact Nicola at (860) 951-7694 or nicolaa@knoxparks.org to let her know you will be helping make Hartford cleaner and more attractive.
  • The Unitarian Society of Hartford (50 Bloomfield Ave) will be hosting a workshop: Active Hope: Reconnecting to the Web of Life & Making a Difference. They say: “It can be an overwhelming challenge to live in these times of climate change, social division and economic decline. How can we feel hopeful, let alone mobilize the energy to face the crises before us and take useful action? We often disconnect, numb out and stay busy to just get by. Is there really another option? This workshop offers an alternative – the path of reconnection. Using practices developed by Joanna Macy, environmental activist and Buddhist scholar, we experience our innate connections with each other and with the interdependent web of existence of which we are all a part.” Bring a lunch; some snacks will be provided. The workshop is from 9:45 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  There is a $20 registration fee, but nobody will be turned away for lack of funds. Contact: Lisa.Galinski@gmail.com
  • HYPE’s Social Events Committee will be hosting a Franklin Avenue South End Tour. This is $20 general, $15 HYPE members. 1-5 p.m. Al Marotta will serve as the tour guide. The price of admission also covers some food tastings and an insulated bag to keep cool any purchases made along the route. It is unclear where exactly this begins and ends, but registration is required so someone will tell you.
  • Musical Theater Revue: This performance will feature excerpts from shows written by Stephen Sondheim, Stephen Schwartz, Jeanine Tesori, William Finn, Charles Strouse, Barbara Schottenfeld, Elizabeth Swados, David Evans, and Tom Greenwald. There is a show at 2 p.m. and another at 7:30 p.m. in Austin Arts Center at Trinity College. It is free, but tickets are required: Call 860-297-2199.
  • Art reception at EBK Gallery for Sharon Butler’s paintings, 6-8:30 p.m. The gallery is located at 218 Pearl Street.

October 18

  • Walk Hartford: Keney Park. Walk Hartford is an activity created by Transport Hartford to encourage people to get out and see the city on foot instead of by car. These are not competitions. Pace is slow enough to allow socializing. Participants should dress appropriately for the activity and weather, and bring their own snacks and water. This free event starts at 9 a.m. in a location to be decided within Keney Park. Check back to the Facebook event page for meeting place and route information.
  • Open Mic Night at Infinity Bistro: every Sunday, this free event begins at 7:30 p.m.

October 19

  • The Friends of Colt Park Walking Club meets every Monday “until snow gets in the way” at 8:30 a.m. by the Colt statue at the Wethersfield Avenue entrance.
  • Wadsworth Atheneum will be screening Little White Lie, “Lacey Schwartz’s story of growing up in a typical middle-class Jewish household in Woodstock, NY, with loving parents and a strong sense of her Jewish identity, despite the questions from those around her about the color of her skin and her curly hair.” Reception at 6 p.m., film at 7 p.m. General admission: $9.
  • Hartford Jazz Orchestra performs every Monday at 8 p.m. at Arch Street Tavern. Free.

October 20

  • Salsa Social at the Hartford Public Library: Bring a partner or stop by solo! No charge and no experience needed. Rey Bermudez will provide instructions during the dance lessons. Starts at 6 p.m.
  • Sally Pinkas at Trinity College. They say: “The performance features Filipino Romantic piano music of the 19th and 20th centuries; a work by Dan Román, associate professor of Music at Trinity; Beethoven’s Rondo in G Major, Op. 51 No. 2; and Schubert’s devilishly difficult “Wanderer” Fantasy in C Major Op. 15, D 760.” This free performance begins at 8 p.m. in the Trinity College Chapel.

October 21

  • Real Art Ways continues its Film 101 series with a screening and discussion of Under the Roofs of Paris at 1 p.m. General admission: $11.
  • The A.K. Smith Reading Series features Jim Shepard at 4:30 p.m. This free event takes place in the Reese Room of Smith House at Trinity College. It’s on the calendar, so it’s open to the public. Stay for the reception and book signing following the event.
  • String Thing: this is a chance to hang out with people who knit, crochet, stitch, and more. Just bring yourself and whatever you’re working on. All ages and skill levels welcome. MakeHartford has some supplies available. 6:30-9 p.m. Free to participate, but donations of materials welcome. This coincides with the MakeHartford open house.

October 22

  • Brené Brown is all the rage in some circles, with her theories on vulnerability. Asylum Hill Congregational Church will be having two discussions today of her book Rising Strong. The first is at 10 a.m., the second at 7 p.m. Contact Erica Thompson if you’d like to participate.
  • Light the Night Walk in Bushnell Park: This walk to raise money to cure blood cancer begins at 5 p.m.
  • Billings Forge Farmers’ Market: This farmers’ market is year-round either on the green (Broad between Capitol and Russ) or at 563 Broad Street, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Hartford Artist & Activist Summit. They say: “The purpose of this event is to build relationships and collaborations between the artist and activist communities for the mutual benefit of everyone. Because as we know, artists and activists both work to raise consciousness (hopefully) and any ways to help art further influence activism and activism further influence, can only help facilitate more change in society.” This free event will be at the Hartford Public Library, 5:30-7:30 p.m., in the ground floor classroom.
  • The Nicaragua Canal Debate: Development, Environment, Rights” panel and reception at Trinity College. Katherine Hoyt and Victor Campos will participate in the panel discussion. This free event begins at 7 p.m. in Mather Hall’s Terrace Rooms.

October 23

  • Cosplayers & Gamers Club at MakeHartford. They say, from 6-9 p.m. “Learn to play unusual games, bring your own game to share.  No charge, freewill contributions always welcome.”

October 24

  • Take a workshop on Garlic Planting at KNOX, 10:30 a.m. Free. Contact Emily Petersen to let her know you plan to be there: (860) 951-7694 ext 28 emilyp@knoxparks.org
  • Today is the Second Annual Mayor Mike’s Classic Car Show, from 12-4 p.m. Open to all years, makes, and models. $10 per car; public admission to ogle the cars is free. This will be on Allyn Street between High and Ann.
  • Fighting for Latino Rights with The Young Lords: A Conversation with Mickey Melendez will feature a 60 minute documentary on The Young Lords, followed by a discussion with former Young Lord and author Mickey Melendez, interviewed by Jorge Limeres. 1-3 p.m. in the Center for Contemporary Culture at Hartford Public Library. Free.
  • East Coast Explosion: Drill, Drum, and Dance Competition — Twelve teams will battle it out from 1-5 p.m. at The Theater of the Performing Arts, 359 Washington Street. Prices vary.
  • If you’re not exhausted yet, go to the Mark Twain House & Museum for their Back to the Eighties Masquerade Dance Party! — a merging of the late 1800’s masquerade with the 1980’s. There will be music provided by DJ Whitney Bobby and cover band OPM. Costume and dance contests, refreshments provided. Cash bar. This is 21+ only. $25 general.

October 25

  • Visit MakeHartford for this month’s Maker Movie: TRON. They say “Peter Colapietro will talk about creating computer games and arduino-laced clothing,” and then watch the 1982 film TRON. 6-8:30 p.m. This is a potluck event. No charge, but donations are accepted. Children are welcome, but parents should keep the movie rating and length of film in mind.
  • Every month Sea Tea Improv has a free show at City Steam Brewery’s Brew Ha Ha Comedy Club, 942 Main. Tonight is that night. 7 p.m. If you are a child, you need to have a legal guardian accompanying you.
  • Open Mic Night at Infinity Bistro: every Sunday, this free event begins at 7:30 p.m.

October 26

  • The Friends of Colt Park Walking Club meets every Monday “until snow gets in the way” at 8:30 a.m. by the Colt statue at the Wethersfield Avenue entrance.
  • Young Blood for Old Brains: lecture by Tony Wyss-Coray, Ph.D. at Trinity College in Mather Hall’s Washington Room at 7 p.m. They say: “Along with other researchers Wyss-Coray conducted and published a study on blood infusions in old mice in Nature Medicine. The researchers used sophisticated techniques to pinpoint important molecular, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological changes in the brains of old mice that shared the blood of young mice.” Free and open to the public.
  • Hartford Jazz Orchestra performs every Monday at 8 p.m. at Arch Street Tavern. Free.

October 27

  • Yoga at Toivo, 10-11 a.m. $5.

October 28

  • Chair Yoga at Toivo, 2-3 p.m. $5.
  • MakeHartford is holding its weekly open house, 6:30-9 p.m. Check out the space! Free.
  • Come to Other People’s Stories to listen to people tell secondhand tales without notes. If you want to be on the stage, send a message to otherstorieshartford@gmail.com to let them know what your story is about. If you want to just listen, all you need to do is show up. This begins at 7:30 p.m. at Real Art Ways. Free.

October 29

  • Billings Forge Farmers’ Market: This farmers’ market is year-round either on the green (Broad between Capitol and Russ) or at 563 Broad Street, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • On The Line: Hartford’s Urban-Suburban History in an Open Access Book: Drop by the common room in Hallden Hall on Trinity College’s campus for a lunchtime lecture by Jack Dougherty on the “book-in-progress” that “traces how schooling and housing boundaries have shaped metropolitan Hartford over the past century, and the struggles of families and activists to cross over, redraw, or erase these powerful dividing lines.” 12:15 p.m. Free and open to the public.
  • 12-Step Yoga: this is a yoga class modeled after 12 step recovery programs. This is from 2-3:30 p.m. at Toivo. $5.
  • Transform Your Life with Laughter and Deep Breathing: a combination of laughter yoga and deep breathing relaxation at Toivo (399 Franklin Ave) at 6 p.m. Wear comfortable clothing and shoes. $5 suggested donation.

October 30

  • Hallowed History Lantern Tour: They say: “Join us for the only night Cedar Hill Cemetery is open to the public after dark. Led by lantern light, attendees will visit the final resting places of some of Cedar Hill’s notable and not-so-notable residents. Character actors will share their true-yet-darker-tales. To ensure your participation in this tour, reservations are required for specific time slots. Book your reservations early by calling 860-956-3311. Please note: This tour may NOT be suitable for children under 13. Wear appropriate walking shoes and bring a flashlight.” We’ll add to this: dress for the season you’re in, not the one you wish you were. If you have to wait outside, you’re bound to get chilly. This is from 6-9:30 p.m. Reservations are required. $15.

October 31

  • David Epstein will be moderating a discussion of Emily Dickinson poems at Hartford Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Free.
  • Reception for Carla Gannis’s  “The Garden of Emoji Delights” at EBK Gallery, 218 Pearl Street. 6-8:30 p.m.
  • Slambovian Circus of Dreams Halloween Costume Ball at Infinity. 8 p.m. Not free.

DISCLAIMERS

  1. There is a deadline for the event listing, and that’s the 25th. If you have info about an event in November, get that info in by the end of day on October 25th.
  2. Activities that are in Hartford proper and are free/low-cost are prioritized. It is up to the discretion of the editor whether or not events are included.
  3. If you’ve mastered adulting, you know that shit happens. Venues close. Performers flake. The marketing person delivered the wrong information. Snowtober. If any of these things might rattle you, contact the venue in advance to confirm event details.